5G in NYC 

Some New Yorkers are asking if 5G is really coming since they haven’t seen 5G network antennas going up, but admit that they don't know what a 5G antenna looks like. (See photos, below.) While we are all sleeping or trying to sleep, during the wee hours the telecom installation trucks come out to install the 5G antennas.

The antenna is at the top of this light pole on the corner of 73rd Street and Columbus Avenue. There are two more like this one on the next corner of 72nd and Columbus and there is another on 75th and Columbus. Photo © 2019

The antenna is at the top of this light pole on the corner of 73rd Street and Columbus Avenue. There are two more like this one on the next corner of 72nd and Columbus and there is another on 75th and Columbus. Photo © 2019

…the opposite corner street view. Photo © 2019

…the opposite corner street view. Photo © 2019

This 5G antenna is on top of this light pole on 74th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus. It literally appeared over-night. This photo was taken at 7:25 AM, Monday. The rectangular metal electrical box is how you can confirm that it’s an antenna. Photo © 2019

This 5G antenna is on top of this light pole on 74th Street between Amsterdam and Columbus. It literally appeared over-night. This photo was taken at 7:25 AM, Monday. The rectangular metal electrical box is how you can confirm that it’s an antenna. Photo © 2019

Here is the same light pole. Notice how close this antenna is to the 6th and 7th floor windows of this high-end building. Photo © 2019

Here is the same light pole. Notice how close this antenna is to the 6th and 7th floor windows of this high-end building. Photo © 2019

We were in Brighton Beach providing EMF consulting. The 5G antennas are atop the Coney Island Hospital. They are the long and thin white poles. Photo © 2019

We were in Brighton Beach providing EMF consulting. The 5G antennas are atop the Coney Island Hospital. They are the long and thin white poles. Photo © 2019

I shared with my friend and partner affiliate, Rob Metzinger of Safe Living Technologies, that I’ve measured the 5G with the Gigahertz Solutions HF59D. This analyzer can measure up to 10 GHz, so it’s capturing the very lowest of the 5G network. 5G can penetrate through windows, but not brick. The signal added a power density average of 3,230 µW/m2 (microwaves per square meter) of High-Frequency microwaves to what was usually present in the office: an average of 5,000 µW/m2 in the 2.4-6.0 GHz band. (At ELEXANA, we do not use any wireless in the office or in our homes.)

Rob shared that someone measured a 27 GHz frequency signal in Santa Barbara which the technician assumed was 5G.

Interestingly, the frequency range of the 5G network is being kept from the public. The RF monitor designers that we’ve been in touch with are all waiting until they know what the frequency range of the 5G network will be so that they can start designing the sensors and circuitry.

Rhode and Schwartz has an analyzer that measures to 99 GHz, but the cost exceeds $40,000. R&S has granted us access to use this tool for when we need it. If you want us to test up to 99 GHz, you’d have to put in a special request with us.